Entrepreneurs on Obama

  Government, Politics and the Economy Entrepreneurs on Obama According to a new survey, entrepreneurs are willing to give the President time to fix the economy, but many have serious questions about the wisdom of his policies. BusinessWeek.com Ownership, Management and Operations 12 Steps to Upgrade Your Business To grow, for your business needs needs to evolve, you need to be able to see where things can be improved and address those areas. Here are a dozen things you can do today to make that happen. SmallBizTrends.com [Read Full Article]


Fighting to Launch: The Tale of Nautical Tours

  Government, Politics and the Economy Securities Industry: Leave Executive Comp to Boards, Not Lawmakers The Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association released guidelines for how financial services firms should tie compensation to long-term performance and risk management, saying that executive pay should be decided by company boards, not by legislators or regulators. Workforce.com Fixing the Economy: Is Obama Flubbing the Fix? With the administration backtracking on major regulatory reform, some critics saying that Obama is squandering a rare opportunity. BusinessWeek.com [Read Full Article]


Merchants May Find Help With Credit Card Costs

  Government, Politics and the Economy Partisan Lines Forming Over Healthcare Reform The top Senate Democrats and President Obama appear aligned in support of a government-run health insurance option, facing off against Senate Republicans who say they refuse to won't back such a measure. WashingtonTimes.com New Bill Could Help Merchants with Credit Card Costs Under a new bill before the House of Representatives, merchants would be able to negotiate with banks to reduce the costs associated with credit card purchases. Reuters.com [Read Full Article]


FTC Demanding Truth in Advertising

We have all seen those ads on TV where the four-hundred pound couch potato is turned into the svelte, chiseled bodybuilder-type with this latest and greatest green miracle at home exercise device that stores easily in a shoebox, is not only fun but actually exciting to use, takes 3 minutes every other day and harnesses the power of rubber bands, springs, dynamic tension, gravity, your own weight, someone else's weight, ball bearings in a swivel, a Chilean brush-tail rat in a runny-wheel—whatever, only to tell you at the bottom of the screen in print so fine that you need a hi-def TV and a magnifying glass to read it: “Results not typical, your results may vary.” What? My results may vary? You mean I am not guaranteed to look like Michaelangelo's David made flesh after my first week of using the miracle exercise product? Apparently not. Apparently, the advertiser is trying to put one over on me—me, and enough other people for the government to take some action. Wh... [Read Full Article]